Tag Archive: Angles


The weather in the mountain state has been fairly odd this year. The seasons have changed much like they would in a Monty Python sketch. Our winter was much more like spring and even now, these first few days of spring have felt more like summer. Despite these weird weather patterns, mother nature know’s it’s spring-time. Which brings us to….

 The Top 3 Wildflowers in West Virginia

3. Ironweed

Ironweed is a fairly tall, and very hardy flower. It’s purple flowers are very pretty and ironweed is known to attract butterflies.

2. Rhododendron 

The rhododendron is the state flower for West Virginia, and it’s easy to see why.

1. Spotted Jewelweed

The spotted jewelweed is a pretty neat little flower. Also known as a ‘touch-me-not’ because of its delicate seed pods, this plant can be used to ease the itching of stinging nettle.

All images obtained from the public domain.


Advertisements

West Virginia really is a unique place to live. It’s elevation and geographical location allows it to be the home for many different plants and animals. Birding in particular is a lot of in West Virginia. Getting up in the early morning, feeling that fresh mountain air on your face and listening to the birds sing is a really great way to start any day. If you are going to go birding in West Virginia, there are some birds that you definitely must see. After doing a little birding myself, these are my five favorite birds in West Virginia.

5. Great Blue Heron:

This bird is really pretty cool looking. It can have a wingspan of up to seven feet, which makes this a really big bird. Seeing something so big fly is really amazing to see, and so I’ve ranked the Great Blue Heron at number five. (Image by Gentry George, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

4. Indigo Bunting:

This bird is really very pretty. In summer, finding an Indigo Bunting in West Virginia is very easy to do. (Image by Barnes Dr Thomas G, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

3. Belted Kingfisher:

These birds can easily be seen and heard anywhere near a river or stream. These birds can be good indicators of how healthy a stream is because they feed on mostly small fish and other aquatic creatures. (Image by C. Schlawe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2. Scarlet Tanager:

This is a bird that can’t be missed. It’s very distinctive crimson color is easily seen when it flies. (Image From Steve Maslowski, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

1. Red-Tailed Hawk:

The red-tailed hawk is a really cool bird to see. It is an amazing predator and its call has been used in many movies. Often times this bird’s call (or its cousin’s call, the call of the red-shouldered hawk) is used instead of a bald eagle’s call, since the bald eagle’s call doesn’t sound very good. (Image from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

All images came from public-domain-image.com or Wikipedia.com and were found in the public domain.

Tilt Shift Photography

In honor of the light-heartedness of Mardi Gras, I thought I’d discuss and share something that is a lot of fun and looks really neat. There is a type of editing that can be done that will make your pictures look like photos of miniature toy models. It’s called tilt shift photography, and it really is a lot of fun.

The most important part of tilt shift photography is to make sure you get the right picture. I have found that the best angle is to be high up, shooting down. You don’t really want an aerial view, but somewhere close to that could work. I have also found that photos of buildings (or anything with really bright colors) works really well too. The bright colors in a photo will look even brighter (and more toy-like) when you increase the saturation, which makes the subject of your photo look more like a miniature model.

Here are a few photos that I tried out using tilt shift photography. Some of it seemed to work pretty well, and others didn’t come out quite right. It’s best to just play around and see what looks good to you.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s also important to have fun with editing and to play around to see what works for you. Here’s a “How-to Guide” for editing your own photos for tilt-shift photography.

West Virginia Photo Op

West Virginia, in my opinion, is one of the best places to be a photographer. There is so much natural beauty here that there is always a place for a photo opportunity. There are plenty of mountains, forests, and rivers so finding wildlife is never a problem. In the spring and summer, there are literally hundreds of different species of wildflowers that bloom. On top of all that there are plenty of places to hike throughout the year to see these kinds of things.

Dolly Sods is definitely one of my favorite places to hike. A hiking trip there can last a day or even a few days. There are plenty of areas to sketch wildlife or to photograph it. In June there are plenty of wild blackberries to eat, but make sure you don’t eat anything unless you know for sure what it is!

West Virginia also has all four seasons, making it ideal for seasonal photography. In the fall, entire mountainsides can turns to various shades of reds, yellows, and oranges. In the winter, it usually snows creating a beautiful, icy landscape. The spring and summer provide a ton of different wildflowers and there are plenty of neat birds that do their spring/summer nesting in WV.

So if you don’t live in West Virginia, definitely take the chance to go see it someday. If you do live in West Virginia, than get out there and enjoy the beauty of ‘The Mountain State.’

Montani semper liberi

Camera Angles

It’s amazing how a change of the camera angle can radically transform a photograph. A bird’s eye view of a forest will be quite different from eye level. I think the key to finding the right angle for a shot is to take lots of pictures from different angles. The old adage ‘practice makes perfect’ is definitely true when it comes to photography. Through practice, a photographer can find what angles work and what ones don’t.

The angle of a photo can be really telling for what type of story is being told. Unique angles tend to be more artsy and less formal. Unique angles may show the subject off to the side of the photo or perhaps looking straight down/up at the subject. This types of angles can also portray a first person view remarkably well, since people don’t always see things at the ‘perfect’ angle anyway.

The more traditional photo tends to be more formal. These types of angles tend to be more straight on and don’t really use camera tilt. While these typs of angles can be used in a more artistic manner, they are generally used to tell stories that can be found in a newspaper or other formal settings; but even now stories found in the news are starting to take more artistc photos. I find this development to be pretty amazing, since the traditional view of printed news seems to be somewhat stuffy and boring. I think it’s great that it’s trying to move in a more upbeat direction.

Now, I know what you’re thinking; “This is (more or less) a nature photography blog! Get back to the nature stuff!” So how can unique angles be used to photograph nature? For one thing, a unique angle can give an animal’s eye view at scenery. Here’s a pretty neat video of a college campus through an animal’s perspective. Also, because nature in itself is unique, I think the best way to portray nature is in a unique way. Looking straight down at a flower or looking straight up at a sycamore can be unique and look really cool too.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

So much for a snow storm

Unfortunately, the snow didn’t last. Deep down, I want around 6 ft of snow. I got a pretty nice shot of the snow coming down, and with it, my hopes were soaring. I tried to catch the flakes in motion, and I had some difficulty. For one thing, getting good lighting along with a shutter speed quick enough to catch the snowflakes in motion wasn’t quite possible for me. With the shutter speed moving at a such a quick pace, the camera wasn’t picking up enough light to create an image.

The cool thing about a shutter speed that doesn’t quite move fast is it can create an image that seems to stretch. This can be especially seen with lights, and I’ve seen some pretty cool photos of cars moving on a road with prolonged exposure. The longer exposure made the snowflakes in my photo look like sheets, and I kind of like the way it turned out.

My backyard when it's snowing.

Sadly, this is my backyard the morning after it snowed. The cold snow was no match for the warm sun and grass that desperately wanted to survive.

My backyard the morning after it snowed.

Close Up Photography

I think close up photography is really cool. Getting a closer look at something that usually goes unnoticed can really show you a brand new world. Close up photography can even take something totally normal and make it look otherworldly. Ultimately, I think making people see the world through a different view is the job of photographers. Sure, those mountains and sunsets look nice, but I find myself yearning for more in my photographs. I like to look at mountains and sunsets, but I want to see them from new angles. I found a great blogger that has some really great work here, and I think he gets it.

Up close look at some shelf fungus on a stump.