Tag Archive: shutter speed


The weather in the mountain state has been fairly odd this year. The seasons have changed much like they would in a Monty Python sketch. Our winter was much more like spring and even now, these first few days of spring have felt more like summer. Despite these weird weather patterns, mother nature know’s it’s spring-time. Which brings us to….

 The Top 3 Wildflowers in West Virginia

3. Ironweed

Ironweed is a fairly tall, and very hardy flower. It’s purple flowers are very pretty and ironweed is known to attract butterflies.

2. Rhododendron 

The rhododendron is the state flower for West Virginia, and it’s easy to see why.

1. Spotted Jewelweed

The spotted jewelweed is a pretty neat little flower. Also known as a ‘touch-me-not’ because of its delicate seed pods, this plant can be used to ease the itching of stinging nettle.

All images obtained from the public domain.


West Virginia really is a unique place to live. It’s elevation and geographical location allows it to be the home for many different plants and animals. Birding in particular is a lot of in West Virginia. Getting up in the early morning, feeling that fresh mountain air on your face and listening to the birds sing is a really great way to start any day. If you are going to go birding in West Virginia, there are some birds that you definitely must see. After doing a little birding myself, these are my five favorite birds in West Virginia.

5. Great Blue Heron:

This bird is really pretty cool looking. It can have a wingspan of up to seven feet, which makes this a really big bird. Seeing something so big fly is really amazing to see, and so I’ve ranked the Great Blue Heron at number five. (Image by Gentry George, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

4. Indigo Bunting:

This bird is really very pretty. In summer, finding an Indigo Bunting in West Virginia is very easy to do. (Image by Barnes Dr Thomas G, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

3. Belted Kingfisher:

These birds can easily be seen and heard anywhere near a river or stream. These birds can be good indicators of how healthy a stream is because they feed on mostly small fish and other aquatic creatures. (Image by C. Schlawe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

2. Scarlet Tanager:

This is a bird that can’t be missed. It’s very distinctive crimson color is easily seen when it flies. (Image From Steve Maslowski, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

1. Red-Tailed Hawk:

The red-tailed hawk is a really cool bird to see. It is an amazing predator and its call has been used in many movies. Often times this bird’s call (or its cousin’s call, the call of the red-shouldered hawk) is used instead of a bald eagle’s call, since the bald eagle’s call doesn’t sound very good. (Image from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

All images came from public-domain-image.com or Wikipedia.com and were found in the public domain.

Shooting In Manual

While it does take some practice, shooting in the manual settings of your camera will be really beneficial for you. Finding the right settings in manual can be tricky at first, but don’t be disheartened if your photos turn out poorly at first. This is one of those cases where hard work, effort, and plenty of experimentation will really pay off and allow you to take very high quality pictures.

So what is it about manual settings that makes it so premium for photo taking? I think first it’s best to explain what the auto setting does. In auto, the camera will take care of adjusting the settings of your camera. It will determine a shutter speed as well as determine what the aperture is. For the most part, you can take some really great photos in this setting; the problem is, it can limit you to where you can take your pictures and how well they turn out.

Manual setting lets you adjust both of these to meet your lighting needs. If there is very little low light, you can manually slow down your shutter speed or widen your aperture. Adjusting these two settings to your needs can allow you take photos better than on the auto setting. Sometimes you may need a certain shutter speed and with manual you can adjust only the aperture, and vice-versa. In the auto function, you don’t have this freedom.

Like I said before, getting the right settings is a matter of playing with your camera’s settings and seeing what works. There will be plenty of failures and mistakes at first, but before you know it you will be able to put your camera right into those settings without a second thought.